PENDLETON MARINE’S QUICK THINKING SAVES THREE IN SOCAL CAR CRASH

U.S. Marines are known for their fast thinking and courage in a time of need. Marines are taught from day one the core values of honor, courage and commitment. U.S. Marine Cpl. Alexandra Nowak, an administrative specialist with Alpha Company, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations West, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, exemplified unwavering courage when she saved the lives of three people Sept. 20.

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Sgt.

What I remember there were 5 of us coming from Pittsburgh Pa. We stopped somewhere waiting for the bus to take us to PI and got drunk on our asses. The guy that was in charge of us was going crazy about us drinking. But we all paid for it for 2 days when we got to PI. At least I know I did. We were not ready for the reception we go. It was like going into the TWILIGHT ZONE.

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You’re on Marine Corps time

I will never forget the first words I heard when I first arrived at MCRD. We arrived from the airport about 10:00 p.m. (military time was not the standard for a few more minutes). It was dark, we had tinted windows, and the building stood out like a brightly lit island in the void. We pulled to a stop, and a Marine stepped on. We had all lost the power of speech when we passed the gate, so it was complete silence for a heartbeat. Then came The Word.

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MARINE OF THE WEEK // FEARLESS LEADER:

Gunnery Sgt. Aubrey McDade
1st Battalion, 8th Marines
Fallujah, Iraq, Nov. 11, 2004
Award: Navy Cross

Shortly after departing their base in Fallujah, then-Sgt. McDade and 1/8 Bravo Company’s 1st Platoon entered an alley and encountered an immediate heavy volume of small arms and machine gun fire. In the opening seconds of the engagement, three Marines were seriously wounded as the well positioned and expecting enemy pinned others down. On contact, McDade rushed from the rear of the platoon column toward the kill zone and immediately deployed a machine gun team into the alley to provide suppressive fire on the enemy. After several attempts to reach casualties in the alley were met with heavy, well-aimed machine gun fire, he showed total disregard for his own safety by moving across the alley and successfully extracting the first of three wounded Marines from the kill zone. Aware of the fact that there were still two wounded Marines in the alley, McDade dashed through the heart of the kill zone two more times, each time braving intense enemy fire to successfully retrieve a Marine. After extracting the last casualty from the kill zone, he assisted in their treatment and medical evacuation. His quick thinking and aggressive actions were crucial in saving the lives of two of the three casualties. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Staff Sgt. Jonathan C. Knauth & Sgt. Kenneth Trotter)

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Stolen Valor

A recent news story regarding a Fake Army Nurse( Vietnam and Iraq Wars) that stole a seat on an Honor Flight to Washington D.C. gave some one the idea to start a Dishonor Flight but there are certain criteria :
1) Must possess a forged or blurred ,in the proper spaces, DD-214 or claim that your records were destroyed in the 1973 fire at the NPRC. Note: a certified copy will not be accepted .
2)Must wear a leather vest with as many pins and,or patches that you can fit.
3)If you are wearing a ribbon stack or any medals they must be arranged out of order and any combat medals can not be DOD engraved.
4) Must have the proper Combat Veterans hat with the war of choice,even if you were to young or old at the time of conflict.
5) Must be able to tell at least one war story that can not be verified or that you were the lone survivor. Better if you were captured and escaped
6) If you require a service animal you must have the proper fake papers to be seated in first class
You can contact Juan A Bee at the dishonor flight HQ.

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Wise a**ed teenager

Back in 1973 I was just 17 years old and talked my mother into letting me sign up. Bus ride to St. Louis, 707 to San Diego. Truck ride to MCRD. Yellow foot prints.
The Corps gave me nothing, I was issued the essentials. I think they charged for replacements.
About two weeks into Boot Camp I was cleaning my M14 on the Company street when an Officer stopped and asked me a question.
Coming to attention I answered his question. An hour later I was shipped to te north side Depot Casual because he didn’t like my answer.
His question? “How do you like it here, Private?”
My answer, “Sir: I could take it or leave it, Sir!”
Spent too much time watching John Wayne. I didn’t know our Platoon 286, Company F was way over recruits.
A talk with an officer and then they said “Sign here,
I was there when JFK was shoot. The Sgt, said “A Marine did it.” Then he said it took him three shots.
A few days later I was on a train home.
Found out a year or two later I could have refused to sign and just gone to another Platoon.
Several years later I was in a match at Camp Lincoln at Springfield, IL. There was a Marine Sgt, at the line next to me. He was shooting an accurized M14 and I had my Remington 40XB 7.62×51 bolt gun. [ Very similar to the issue USMC sniper rifle. Very similar to the M40 ]
I have a left master eye so I was shooting left handed, Standing there we were facing each other. I fired my 10 rounds, including a reload faster than the Sgt.. He was so interested in watching me reach over the rear sight and work the bolt with from the left shoulder he forgot to fire his tenth shot. I beat him on time, and score.
I shouldn’t have signed

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