Need Help Identifying Boot Camp Cartoon Pics

I found these pictures at an antique store. The are four cartoon-like pictures in the set ( have attached two), depicting life in boot camp. They are dated OK for publication in 1949. I have checked with the Marine Corps Historical Society without any luck in identify the source of the pictures. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Semper Fi, Larry Chorzelewski, SSgt

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“C” Rats, good enough for Chesty, good enough for me – 1977

Started Bootcamp 31Jan1977, 3rd Bn. Platoon 3037, Recruit Depot Paris Island, SC.
We had C-Rats in the field that were canned in 1943 and 1944. 33 & 34 year old chew, We Loved It, heated em’ up with heat tabs and enjoyed. 3 years and all the C-Rats you can eat at the 2nd Bn. 7th Marine Ret., and a John Wayne, Heat tabs, and a little hot sauce from the PX, Made the field not so bad. The hills of Camp Pendleton was a vacation compared to jungles of Vietnam that all my Drill Instructors and Platoon Sergeants saw. God Bless Senior Drill Instructor SSgt. Moch, and God Bless the Marine Corps,,,,,
Semper Fi,,,

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Sacrifice

My heart goes out to the family and Marine Corps brothers and sisters of these fallen heroes. I am a Marine vet of the 60s, my son a Marine vet of the gulf war, and his daughter is now an active duty Marine preparing to deploy. Also have a grandson serving in the Air Force who just finished a tour in the presidential honor guard in Washington. Serving your country is an honor but sacrifice like this reminds us not to take our military for granted.

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mamma mamma can’t you see?

I remember very well the first day at boot camp, zero dark thirty meeting my new sisters. I also remember not being able to pee for hours and everyone being so mad at me and so tired. When I did pee I was up peeing all night. (not my proudest moment). After I got used to being yelled at, making my bed a certain way and showering with my hole barracks, it was ok. I even went on to Officer Candidate School after I graduated from college. The things I remember most was chow time, cleaning my gun and writing home and uniform inspection the good old days I wouldn’t change it for the world, even though I suck at lad nav. semper fi 1st Lt Waller

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“Carry On”

The piece on Iwo Jima intrigued me for I have an unusual take on it. My father, who was born on February 23rd, 1923, enlisted days after Pearl Harbor in the Air Corps. The middle of three boys he went on to service in the 8th Air Force in one of the first B-17 Groups to arrive in England. An aunt, who had moved to California in the early 1930’s for health reason, married an honest to goodness ‘China Marine,’ who as a young man had served with 2/5 at Belleau Wood. The older brother, who had married early in 1941 enlisted in the Corps and with his mechanical background was assigned to training with the newly organized Amphibious Tractor Command at New Bern, NC. The youngest brother left high school after his third year in 1944 and joined the Navy.
How the ‘Flag Raising’ photo brings these diverse facts together is this. My godfather, the Marine uncle, brought 4th Division Marines ashore at Iwo Jima in the second wave. He witnessed the flag raising on my father’s birthday while on the beach when hundreds of offshore ship whistles brought it to everyones attention. He later told me that that actually overwhelmed the noise of battle. He had helped develop amphibious tactics at Cape Glouchester with the 3rd Division and battled with the 4th Division in the Saipan-Tinian campaign and again at Iwo Jima. He served with the 5th Amphibious Tractor Battalion and survived the war.
The youngest brother had been assigned to a newly commissioned destroyer and was earning its first battle star in the Iwo Jima invasion. His ship was among those who closed with Suribachi sending much needed firepower into its slopes covering the attacking Marines and those on the beaches. The brothers were unaware of their connection to Iwo Jima till after war’s end. Their sister told me years later that they all had a good laugh when they realized the connection. She told me my father asked his brother if he thought of him on my father’s birthday and his reply was, “No, I was kinda busy,”
This uncle remained in the Navy and served for thirty-years retiring as a Warrant Officer. His ship earned its second battle-star off Okinawa and was part of the fleet in Tokyo Bay at the surrender. He sailed off to the Korean War and took part in covering 2/5 at Wo Mi Do island at Inchon. He took part in two fleet ’round the world’ cruises, the Cuban Blockade and Admiral McCain’s 7th Fleet at Yankee Station.
Following my high school graduation and knowing college was out of my reach and the draft looming in my future I decided to enlist in the Corps. I was sent to RVN and assigned to 2/5 covering in the Chu Lai and Chu Mi areas and later with 1st MarDiv Hdqtrs. near Da Nang.
My Marine uncle’s grandson enlisted, too, and served with the 1st Marine Division in Desert Storm taking part in both the feigned beach assault and the famous holding action of the Army’s ‘Swinging Gate’ strategy. At family get-togethers he, our Navy uncle and I swapped stories about battleship gunfire with our experiences of those historic ships, off Pacific Islands, Vietnam and Kuwait.
One photograph and its connecting the Corps over four generations. Carry on…

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Secretary, Legion Post 69 , Roncevert, W.V. – 9th Dist. Adjutant,Am. Legion in W.V.

MOS 0311, 0321,0331,0341 , 0351, 8541 (now o317) Scout Sniper in Viet Nam 1967-69. Member of the Pocahontas County Honor CorpsWe use M-1 Gerands manufactured in 19 ( performing final military rites for Honorably discharged Veterans upon family request ). The Honor Corps was established 28 years ago to provide this service because we are so rural various military units were not available . We use M-1 Gerands made in 1939 for the three volley salute . But we also have two Springfield 03 rifles painted white for ceremonial purposes & they flank the American Flag in all of our formations & functions .
Respectfully Submitted in their Honor,
John S. Lamb

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16th Award Expert

As a retired Marine who served from 1981 thru 2001, the only ‘service rifle’ I ever knew was the M-16. I started out with the A1 in boot camp, shot high Sharpshooter (1 point out of Expert), but at the 500 yard line I was 10 for 10!
About the time I reenlisted we received the A2, I decided that if I was going to be a part of this ‘gun club’, I needed to get my act together and qual Expert. Thereafter, I qualified Expert 16 consecutive times. In my 20 years I only missed the 500 yard bulls eye twice!
While on Okinawa in 1999, I was able to score 9 out of 10 hits in the black with 6 in the ‘X’ ring with a 3 – 5 mph left to right breeze …at 800 yards! Don’t tell me that the M-16 is not capable of accuracy.

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“Carry On”

The piece on Iwo Jima intrigued me for I have an unusual take on it. My father, who was born on February 23rd, 1923, enlisted days after Pearl Harbor in the Air Corps. The middle of three boys he went on to service in the 8th Air Force in one of the first B-17 Groups to arrive in England. An aunt, who had moved to California in the early 1930’s for health reason, married an honest to goodness ‘China Marine,’ who as a young man had served with 2/5 at Belleau Wood. The older brother, who had married early in 1941 enlisted in the Corps and with his mechanical background was assigned to training with the newly organized Amphibious Tractor Command at New Bern, NC. The youngest brother left high school after his third year in 1944 and joined the Navy.
How the ‘Flag Raising’ photo brings these diverse facts together is this. My godfather, the Marine uncle, brought 4th Division Marines ashore at Iwo Jima in the second wave. He witnessed the flag raising on my father’s birthday while on the beach when hundreds of offshore ship whistles brought it to everyones attention. He later told me that that actually overwhelmed the noise of battle. He had helped develop amphibious tactics at Cape Glouchester with the 3rd Division and battled with the 4th Division in the Saipan-Tinian campaign and again at Iwo Jima. He served with the 5th Amphibious Tractor Battalion and survived the war.
The youngest brother had been assigned to a newly commissioned destroyer and was earning its first battle star in the Iwo Jima invasion. His ship was among those who closed with Suribachi sending much needed firepower into its slopes covering the attacking Marines and those on the beaches. The brothers were unaware of their connection to Iwo Jima till after war’s end. Their sister told me years later that they all had a good laugh when they realized the connection. She told me my father asked his brother if he thought of him on my father’s birthday and his reply was, “No, I was kinda busy,”
This uncle remained in the Navy and served for thirty-years retiring as a Warrant Officer. His ship earned its second battle-star off Okinawa and was part of the fleet in Tokyo Bay at the surrender. He sailed off to the Korean War and took part in covering 2/5 at Wo Mi Do island at Inchon. He took part in two fleet ’round the world’ cruises, the Cuban Blockade and Admiral McCain’s 7th Fleet at Yankee Station.
Following my high school graduation and knowing college was out of my reach and the draft looming in my future I decided to enlist in the Corps. I was sent to RVN and assigned to 2/5 covering in the Chu Lai and Chu Mi areas and later with 1st MarDiv Hdqtrs. near Da Nang.
My Marine uncle’s grandson enlisted, too, and served with the 1st Marine Division in Desert Storm taking part in both the feigned beach assault and the famous holding action of the Army’s ‘Swinging Gate’ strategy. At family get-togethers he, our Navy uncle and I swapped stories about battleship gunfire with our experiences of those historic ships, off Pacific Islands, Vietnam and Kuwait.
One photograph and its connecting the Corps over four generations. Carry on…

read more