Smoking in boot camp, NOT.

Paris Island 1963.
The first day of boot camp our DI asked us to vote whether to smoke or not. He explained how smoking would limit us physically because of the PT and of course double timing everywhere we went. Remember, “Hurry up and wait”. And all the other training, the rope clime, log PT,
the confidence course, etc…….
Our platoon overwhelmingly voted not to smoke. Of course I was not a smoker, but was pleased that everyone choose not to smoke.
At the end of bootcamp our DI gave the platoon permission to smoke.
The comment that was made by many was, “Wow, I forgot about smoking until now”.
We were so busy every day with training that the smokers did not realize that they had not smoked for 13 weeks.
Now that’s a way to give up smoking, enlist in the Marine Corps. 😉

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0231

Have seen this before, not that way in July 1961 at SD. But, having heard “Hollywood Marine”, there was actually a movie filmed during boot canp with our platoon running the confidnce course in the background, with Tony Curtis as Ira Hayes, think it was filmed as The Last Man, but released as The Outsider. Honoring today one of our junior DIs, SGT E-4 J.J. McCormack from NY. Saw he was KIA in Vietnam as SSGT E-6. Saw him at I think Butler on Okinawa digging ditches as a PVT and told him he was too good a Marine for that, saw him maybe a year later on Okinawa as SGT E-5. God rest his soul.

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The Hat From Hell

PI/67 Day 3
He had a Very Heavy Latin Accent, and appeared from out of nowhere.
“I Gon Kill One Of Jew Mudder Puckers An Noooooooo Baaaaaaady
Gon Kaaaaar.” On the nights he had the duty he would get us out the racks an hour or two before Reveille. It was Game time, mostly he would Quiz you on the School Hat lessons, You better get it Right. He clocked a TURD so HARD one night the TURD next to him PUKED. SEMPER FI, LADIES

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1st 72 hours in the Corps

o800 hours on April 5 1961 , as requested, was standing in front of the Post Office of my home town, waiting for my recruiter to pick me up drive me to his office in Nashville Tn and complete the enlistment process. On the way I mentioned something to him that I heard they harassed you some at P I. He at first acted like he didn’t know the meaning of the word and then said maybe for the first couple days but that I shouldn’t worry about it. Easy for him say. Got to the office and met up with 3 other guys from other towns in Middle Tn. Spent the day doing paper work, getting sworn and killing time . Some time in the late afternoon we were walked to the Railroad Station, given our orders, a couple meal tickets and instructions on how to find the bus depot in Atlanta and what time we better be there. Got to Atlanta early on the morning of the 6th and several hours to kill before our bus time in late afternoon. Passed a tattoo parlor and one of the other guys decided that since we were now in the Corps he would get a Devil Dog tattoo.

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We know where you’re going

April 4, 1962, along with a large group of recruits, I was inducted into the Corps at New York City and put on a chartered American Airlines flight to PI. Once airborne, a young looking recruit asked the stewardess for a beer. She complied and another recruit saw the transaction and stated, “Hey, I didn’t know you could get served”. The stewardess, overhearing the comment stated, “We know where you’re going”. Needless to say, the airplane’s alcoholic beverage supply was severely depleted prior to landing in South Carolina. It was a very social group of recruits that arrived at PI’s main gate in the subsequent bus ride. All was fine until that DI stepped onto the bus and boomed out, “All right, Maggots, eyes straight ahead and listen up” You know the rest of the story…………

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A walk through The Arizona Territory.

Before I share this story I would like to explain that I wrote these in order to deal with my PTSD. I also thought my family might be interested in learning why I “seem different” to them by sharing some of my experiences. Which is why the stories were written as they were. Those combat Marines who served in Vietnam might remember that we were not very popular back home. I wrote about 50 stories—they are true—they happen to me—I remember every one like it happen yesterday and for awhile these experiences changed my way of thinking, feeling, and interacting with others (including my family). I found that the VA has an excellent treatment program that worked me. “Thank you my brothers and Semper Fi.”

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Info For Marine Enlistees Leaving For Training

While searching through my collection of Marine memorabilia I found a paper with general information about leaving for recruit training.
What to take: Small gym bag, change of underwear & socks, extra shirt, soap, towel, toothbrush etc..
What not to take: Knives,guns,blackjacks, brass knuckles or any other dangerous objects including glass bottles. No alcoholic beverages or large amounts of money. Common sense should judge what to take. ( We had alcohol on the bus from Charleston to P.I. and one guy packed a 12 inch screwdriver that was found during receiving )
General Info: You will be going to Parris Island, S.C. for approximately 10 weeks of recruit training and then to Camp Lejeune N.C. for 4 weeks of Individual Combat Training . While at Parris Island you will participate in the most challenging ,most rigorous and finest training in the world. The best advice to give you is to do as you are told and always give your best. You will be treated well, and remember that the Marine Corps is always interested in your welfare. To put you one step ahead of the game memorize you service number and the General Orders listed below. Welcome aboard , Marine. Good luck and come and visit us on you return from boot camp.
I condensed it a little. Bring back any memories? Will soon be 53 years. What a time! SEMPER FI! Harry 1371

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That one time in Boot Camp

Parris Inland in the summer of 1968—the summer of love for hippies on the west
coast. However, not so much for Platoon 296 on Parris Inland with Sgt.
Morris—not even close! We had completed about half of our training when recruits
started coming in from being recycled. That’s when we learned that the Drill
Instructor Sgt. Morris told us the truth about doing our entire enlistment at
Parris Inland if we couldn’t get our “sh-t together” and move on Camp Stone Bay
(for 03’s). I know there are Marines out there who can confirm the fear factor
we were feeling. I mean, I was barely 17 and wanted to see women again before I
got too old to appreciate them.

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