Marines Are Something Sacred

“I have grown to look upon Marines as something sacred,
I have laughed with them and cried with them,
Cursed them and prayed for them,
Shivered and sweltered with them,
Fought with them,
bled with them, and held them in my arms while they died.
I have buried them.
And all the time I have loved them.”
–Major Gene Duncan

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Foggy Rifle Range Memory

Calling Marines of 1958 PI boot camp era: can anyone remember and provide the rifle range details for this old Marine, obviously now in his mid-seventies who, much to my dismay, is having difficulty recalling the exact firing protocol for each position with our M1’s back in the day? Specifically, what the did we shoot in the four positions of offhand, kneeling, sitting and prone? This is all I remember (I think): 100 yds. offhand; either 200 and/or 300 yds. kneeling and sitting; and pretty sure we did prone at 500 yards. Which positions and associated distances were shot in slow fire and which in rapid fire? Referring to the USMC Manual of the day yielded zero results. Your help to answer these nagging questions will be very much appreciated. Semper Fi to all brother and sister Marines.

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In The Head

You may have heard this before.  However, a couple of decades later while in the San Diego airport, waiting for my flight, I can’t believe I actually had the presence of mind to remember it when a young, just graduated from Navy Boot Camp, seaman saw me leaving the urinal straighaway to the exit, I’m sure, noticing my 3rd Marine Division ball cap, and made the remark… it was priceless, and I still wonder at my ability to recall and use it.

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NEVER FORGET 26.08.2021

NEVER FORGET 26.08.2021

The Department of Defense announced the names of the 13 service members who were killed in action while supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel. They died Aug. 26, 2021, as the result of an enemy attack while supporting non-combatant evacuation operations in Kabul, Afghanistan. For the Marine Corps, the deceased are: Staff Sgt. Darin T. Hoover, 31, of Salt Lake City, Utah. Sgt. Johanny Rosario Pichardo, 25, of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Sgt. Nicole L. Gee, 23, of Sacramento, California. Cpl. Hunter Lopez, 22, of Indio, California. Cpl. Daegan W. Page, 23, of Omaha, Nebraska. Cpl. Humberto A. Sanchez, 22, of Logansport, Indiana. Lance Cpl. David L. Espinoza, 20, of Rio Bravo, Texas. Lance Cpl. Jared M. Schmitz, 20, of St. Charles, Missouri. Lance Cpl. Rylee J. McCollum, 20, of Jackson, Wyoming. Lance Cpl. Dylan R. Merola, 20, of Rancho Cucamonga, California. Lance Cpl. Kareem M. Nikoui, 20, of Norco, California. The Marine Corps mourns the deaths of our 11 Marines, and joins together in grief with the Navy and Army over the loss of our teammates: Navy Hospitalman Maxton W. Soviak, 22, of Berlin Heights, Ohio. Army Staff Sgt. Ryan C. Knauss, 23, of Corrytown, Tennessee. “These fallen heroes answered the call to go into harm’s way to do the honorable work of helping others. We are proud of their service and deeply saddened by their loss,” said Gen. David H. Berger, Commandant of the Marine Corps.

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10 FALLEN HEROES

Statement from the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General David H. Berger: “It is with extremely heavy hearts that we learned several Marines and other service members were killed and wounded in the Kabul attacks today. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families as they are notified of this devastating loss. These fallen heroes answered the call to go into harm’s way to do the honorable work of helping others. We are proud of their service and deeply saddened by their loss. As we mourn, we also keep those who are still over there protecting Americans and our Afghan partners at the forefront of our thoughts. Our Marines will continue the mission, carrying on our Corps’ legacy of always standing ready to meet the challenges of every extraordinary task our Nation requires of her Marines. I am continually humbled by the courage and warrior spirit exhibited every day by Marines across the globe. The sacrifices Marines make on behalf of freedom must never go unnoticed or unappreciated. I ask that you keep these Marines and service members, and especially their families, in your thoughts and prayers.”

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Definitely A Different Language

I remember one JOB in particular. It was in the wooden Barracks at MCAS El Toro Santa Ana. This was in 1969, it seems as though you were either coming from, or going to RVN. There were many old salts waiting to go home. Some of which had only a pair of utilities, and a new set of greens, receiving early outs to go home for Christmas. The majority were coming from 3rd Marine Division. PFC Kenneth Rexford Brown, formerly Sgt. Brown showed me how to pull your blankets tighter from underneath the rack, by using the springs. Of course we learned that in recruit training but KR had a trick that made the blanket tighter still and even remained that way. I believe KR got out and went to WalaWala Washington. I remember that many of the Marines were “cut a huss” for not having the proper uniforms. I can remember the inspecting Colonel coming closer and approaching a Marine that was obviously not prepared for inspection. He would ask where are coming from Marine? The Marine would reply something almost incoherent, and definitely a different language. The Colonel only said “well done Marine” and continued his inspection. That was definitely one of those days when I knew I had been in the presence of heroes. That evening we celebrated by putting a poncho liner inside a footlocker filling that with ice and beer, and listening to Johnny Cash and Luther played the boogy woogy. The party was great until the OD made us take our shindig outside the barracks. After paying for the beer, ice, and a battery operated record player the only record we could afford was albums on sale in the PX. Johnny sold for .99 and a pack of Camels for .27 cents. I remember Friday morning formation, when Captain Wade, Mustanger and one of the greatest Marines to put on a uniform would read off the names of Marines shipping out WESPAK. I remember Sgt Joe Dunlap our Platoon Sgt. in El Toro. I saw him again in Hawaii as GySgt Dunlap and I was a SSGT. We were mounting up for Operation Frequent Wind. I remember being “gigged” while on embassy duty in Chile for having dust on my wall locker display. Even with that “gig” we won the detachment of the year award. 3 Years Running. I mean RUNNING our NCOIC SSGT Turnbow had been a Physical Fitness Instructor prior to coming on MSG. That guy made us run like Forrest Gump. Like Forrest, my running days are over. Our memories and Junk on the Bunk are what make us ALWAYS A MARINE. Semper Fi D. Womack.

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MARINE OF THE WEEK // Single-handedly repelled an ISIS ambush

MARINE OF THE WEEK // Single-handedly repelled an ISIS ambush

Staff Sgt. Patrick Maloney
2d Marine Raider Battalion, Marine Corps Raiders
August 27, 2016
Operation Inherent Resolve, Kirkuk, Iraq
Award: Bronze Star W/ Combat “V”

Staff Sergeant Maloney’s team was conducting partnered reconnaissance operations on a prominent ridge along the Kurdish Defensive Line from an observation post exposed to a 280 degree fan of enemy-held territory. As the team established security, three team members were ambushed and pinned down under heavy and accurate enemy fire from positions 500 meters to the west. Enemy machine gun rounds impacted the vehicle his teammates were using for cover. Taking decisive action, he immediately crossed open ground, retrieved ammunition, and took charge of a Peshmerga heavy machine gun in an exposed and open truck bed. Remaining deliberately exposed to withering fire, he laid deadly suppressive fire on the enemy fighting positions. The Peshmerga heavy machine gun malfunctioned twice, requiring him to perform immediate and remedial action while exposed to rounds impacting within feet of his position. His fearless actions and fierce suppression gained fire superiority and enabled his teammates to return safely to covered positions. His bold actions further contributed to the immediate withdrawal of the enemy forces. By his extraordinary courage, zealous initiative, and total dedication to duty, Staff Sergeant Maloney reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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Marines don’t have that problem.

“Some people wonder all their lives if they’ve made a difference. Marines don’t have that problem.” – Ronald Reagan A Marine assigned to the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) calms an infant during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 20. U.S. service members and coalition partners are assisting the Department of State with a Non-combatant Evacuation Operation (NEO) in Afghanistan. Submit your own Story>>

To All Afghan Vets

I know that for many Afghanistan veterans, seeing the nation fall so swiftly into Taliban hands is sad, disappointing, and infuriating. Many of you spent your youth and the worst days of your life serving in this war. Just know that you did exactly what your nation asked of you, and the failure in Afghanistan was a failure of policy from the people at the top, not the Lance Corporals on the ground. You fought for the Marines to your left and right to make it through each day. Reach out to any Marines you know who served in Afghanistan and just ask them how they’re doing. It certainly can’t hurt. Author: @Terminal Lance Submit your own Story>>