WAY TO GO MARINE !!!!!!!!

I had a similar experience in Vietnam, I was nominated for the Navy Cross but because I was not attached to a marine unit it was downgraded to the Silver Star, reason my actions were not heroic enough for the Cross I was awarded the Silver Star. Medals are not given they’re earned and then awarded. We serve our country and hope that we serve with honor and valor and when we do the hope is that we are observed doing it and are recognized for the execution of that action. OOHRAH MARINE!!!!!!!! WELL DONE!!!!!!!!

read more

Ham and MF

Having extra time on my hands these days I just thought I would try and make my own version of ham and limas. Turned out pretty good. It was missing something though I think it was the fatty goo and mushy MFs that I remember. I do make a lot of beans and wienies. Mine are more like chilli beans and wienies. Anyone hear about the Marine traveling across country. Stopped for gas somewhere in Arizona. After filling his tank and being short on funds thought he would try to get some free stuff. Told the owner ( former Army guy) That for a pack of smokes that he would make his dog talk. The owner said you’re on. The Marine being able to throw his voice ask the dog. “how does your owner treat you?” The dog answered “He beats me, hardly ever feeds me, and keeps me tied up all of the time” The owner grumbled alittle but gave the Marine his smokes. The Marine thought “Wow this dude is easy” So he thought he would try again. He said,” For a six pack of beer I can make those sheep in that field talk.” The owner handed the Marine the six pack and said “Those sheep will lie” Harry 1371

read more

SSgt. Robert Pedro Mendoza AUGUST 13, 1976 – APRIL 20, 2020

Robert Pedro Mendoza, loving father, son, and brother, passed away on April 20, 2020 at the age of 43.
Robert was born on August 13, 1976 in Houston, Texas to Robert and Yolanda (Romero) Mendoza. Growing up, he attended various catholic schools in the Houston area. Robert was very outgoing and mischievous and the school principals knew him very well. In May 1994, he graduated from Sam Rayburn High School in Pasadena, Texas.

read more

MARINE OF THE WEEK // FOUGHT OFF 200 TALIBAN:

MARINE OF THE WEEK // FOUGHT OFF 200 TALIBAN:

Cpl. Jason D. Jones
Embedded Training Team 5-3
Afghanistan, July 13, 2008
Award: Silver Star

While embedded with two Marines and a U.S. Army platoon alongside the Afghan National Army, Cpl. Jones and the coalition forces came under an intense, coordinated predawn attack from an estimated 200 enemy forces. He calmly returned suppressive fires while encouraging the Afghan soldiers to deliver well-aimed defensive fires. Seeing a seriously wounded Afghan soldier in the open, he and another Marine ran across 35 meters of open ground to drag him back to their position, where Jones treated his life-threatening wounds. When a U.S. Army squad manning an observation post was in danger of being overrun after suffering heavy casualties, Jones and a fellow Marine crossed 130 meters of fire-swept ground with a M-240B machinegun and ammunition that proved vital to repelling the attack. Jones constantly exposed himself to grenades and fires from the attackers as he provided lifesaving first aid to several of the wounded U.S. soldiers. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Paul Zellner)

read more

PENDLETON FIRE DEPARTMENT LOOKS AHEAD TO 2020 FIRE SEASON

While mitigating the spread of COVID-19 is the now primary focus of Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton leadership and the rest of the world, there are still service members and civilians on base performing tasks essential to Pendleton’s status as the premier Fleet Marine Force training base on the West Coast.

read more

Dobermans in WWII

In the early 40’s my parents purchased a Doberman as did one of our neighbors. During WWII the Marine Corps requested Dobermans and being patriotic Americans they both complied. At the end of the war the Corps asked if we wanted the dogs back. My parents declined but our neighbor took his. The dog was extremely docile and lived a long life.
PS> My Dad was a WWI veteran and I served in the Corps during the Vietnam era as an 0311 grunt.

read more

SSgt

I joined the Corp right after my 17th Birthday in August of 57. I went through processing in Cleveland Ohio and then our group went by train to PI. We got off the train at Yemassee and a Greyhound Bus was waiting. Piled on for the ride to PI. When we arrived we went to Receiving and that’s when the fun started. We all remember Receiving and getting off the bus and there were no yellow foot prints. I remember when the bus stopped and the door opened this screaming tornado wearing a Campaign Hat instructed us to get off HIS bus in no uncertain terms which we did rapidly. We formed into 3 rows of tall corn on HIS deck. Our group leader had our paper work which one of the DI’s took and as it was about 3AM we were put to work doing menial jobs as our DI’s wouldn’t set upon us till later. I was wearing a sport coat which my Mother insisted I wear when I left home and one of the DI’s spotted me and said “Here, you look like a college man” and where upon he gave me a push broom and told me to sweep down. I think we were given breakfast at some time but I’m not sure of exactly when.
We started out as Plt 256 which I was not with very long as I was a “fat body” at 198! Ha! I wish I weighed 198 now but that’s another story. Anyway, I got sent to the “Strength Platoon” which was a FUBAR as I should have gone to the “Fat Body Platoon” but it was full up so I ended up in Strength. The only difference as far as I could tell was the fat guys were on a diet whereas strength could eat all we wanted. Didn’t take me long to figure out that I should be on a diet too.
We did PT all day long. In those days fat and strength were in a barracks out by the rifle ranges
and we did our PT behind that barracks. There was an oval asphalt track behind the barracks with a grassy center. We would do PT and then take a lap, PT and take a lap all morning long, break for noon chow then back at PT and laps till supper time. We took showers and got ready for supper. That was the day at that time. Have no idea what goes now!
Anyway, after 20 days I passed the PFT and transferred out to Plt 276. In those days the Corp was forming a Plt a day.
So, I arrive at Plt 276 which as in what was called the 3rd Bn area, I think. May have been the old 4th Bn area. After 63 years some memories fade.
Anyway I was dropped off in front of a Quonset Hut and told to wait. As I waited I could hear cadence being called and the sound of double timing feet. They were weaving in and out of the rows of Quonset Huts and after about 10 minutes or so they came around to the front of the hut where I was waiting and the DI looked at me and said “Who the fuck are you”? I squeaked out “Pvt Furry, Sir reporting as ordered”. He said fall in at the rear. As I did he yelled “Double Time” and off we went. That was my introduction to then SSgt Robert Rubachko! The finest Marine I ever knew. He retired as a Major but that’s another story.
To be continued if I can find this place again.
One thing I would like to say is being a Marine is a state of mind! I imagine Soldiers, Sailors, Air Men and Coast Guards all feel the same way about their Services. Could be wrong.

read more

Finally

This article appeared on Facebook
Yesterday, the Defense POW / MIA Accounting Agency announced that Sergeant Fred Farris of China Springs, Texas has been accounted for as of 14 April 2020.

Fred was born on 4 August 1924, the first child for nineteen-year-old Elizabeth Gilmore Farris and her husband, also named Fred. Two younger siblings arrived before the decade was out. The Farris family made their home in Hillsboro, Texas for several years before Elizabeth and Fred Senior split up. Elizabeth took Fred Junior, Kenneth, and Betty Jo to China Spring, where she married one John R. Pepper. The Farris children – they kept their original surname – attended grade school in China Spring and high school in nearby Waco.

read more

Marines to Army

In 1972 I went into the Marines and got out in 1974. Was out only a short time and decided to see what the Army was about. I did not have to go to Army Boot Camp because they said I had the worlds finest training in the Marines. For my first year and a half I was stationed at the Presidio in San Francisco, right off the Golden Gate Bridge. After that, I was sent to Berlin Germany when it was still East and west. I can only say it was one big vacation in the Army. Have any of you Marines gone to another branch after the Marines? The funny thing is, I hardly ever think about the Army but the Marines is where my heart is at. Semper Fi

read more