Heroic last stand, Marines thwart enemy attack

Heroic last stand
By: Steven G. Xiarhos

Opening by Lance Cpl. Casey Jones, Regimental Combat Team 1

RAMADI, IRAQ (April 29, 2008)
It was a typical quiet morning on April 22, with the temperature intensifying as a bright orange sun emerged high from the horizon.

Lance Cpl. Jordan Haerter, a rifleman with 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 1, and Cpl. Jonathan T. Yale, a rifleman with 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, RCT-1, were standing post, just as they’ve done numerous times before. During a standard length watch in a small checkpoint protected by concrete barriers where they overlooked the small gravel road, lined with palm trees leading to their entry control point.

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Old Corps Drill Instructor

Looking Back At The Old Corps
Submitted by: Ron “Tank” Rotunno

In 1965, one special career Marine had excelled as a leader of men. Yes, he had claimed membership in “the few, the proud”, but more than that, he was gung-ho, a hard-charger, a member of the “Old Corps”. At age 37, Sgt. J.R. Mickel was senior D.I. of Platoon #135 Company, 1st Recruit Battalion. To most raw recruits at Parris Island, he might as well been God Himself. He not only commanded their respect; he led them beyond the call of duty. As an 0300 infantryman, he’d earned the Silver Star for bravery in Korea, with combat stars for time of actual enemy encounter. The recruits knew all of this, although he, himself, never told them.

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An Account of “Incoming Fire” over two Gooks

Two Gooks on a Jeep!
By Chris Sarno

It was mid autumn 1951 on the Eastern Front at the Punchbowl sector. I was basically a boot-ass replacement in “A” Company 1st Tank Battalion (Our Company Commander was Capt. Schnell), and I was anxiously awaiting my baptism of fire any day now, as our tank company was operating practically every other day with direct fire combat missions.

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Short Stories From Heterich

Short Stories from Heterich

Herterich’s Autobiography

Joined A-Tks in 1952. After a short tour at ‘8th & V Joined 2nd Tks in late ’53’ just as they were receiving the new ‘M-48’. Over the next three years served in ‘A’ & ‘B’ ending with ‘Flames’. On my fitness report I asked for ‘Panama’, everyone said ‘You will never get it’, I did the next three years at Mar.Bks. 15th Naval District [Panama]. While in ‘Panama’ I put ‘1st Mar.Div.’ on my fitness report, againyou will never get it. ‘Everyone goes to camp lejeune’, when the orders came ——1st Tank Bn.. Three yearsthe first half with ‘Flames’, the second half with ‘H&S Co. Property [Supply]’ in the ‘Butler Bldg.’ above the ‘C.P.’. A year with ‘3rd Tanks’Flames. Back to ‘Camp Pendleton’ with ‘School Bn.’ on the ‘Ramp’ in the ‘Tool Room’. Against my wishesThree years Recruiting in Philadelphia. The next set of orders put me in ‘VN’SIXTY-SEVEN DAYS OVER AND BACK. The left eye ended up in the South China Sea, the Navy was kind enough to replace it with one with a beautiful MARINE CORPS EMBLEM. The new eye on occasion has raised some eyebrows. After the Hospital, back to School Bn.Tank School #407 & Machine Ranges. On one occasion during a ‘IG’ a Colonel inspecting [troops in ranks], stopped in front of me. Took one look at the ‘eye’, and that was the end of his inspecting the troops. Why he left I do not know! Retired ‘Not Fit for Duty in My Rank with 40% disability.

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Winning with the Picture from Iraq

Sgt Grit,

Hello from the holy land in the desert. Man it sucks here but we are making the best of a bad situation. Food is good and water is plentiful. No booze though unless you really have a hankering for some near beer.

Just wanted to send you some pictures of a couple of dedicated Marine along with a story. We had just taken over for the preceding MALS and the preceding unit had been flying the Marine Corps colors everyday. Well to say the least, one of our gunny’s noticed they were not out there. So being the inquisitive one he asked where they were. Well these old colors were well worn from all the wind and dust in this place.

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Marine Corps DI’s Never Die

Drill Instructors Never Die!
Brian L. Hipwell
Adjutant/Paymaster
Twin State Detachment (#1010)
Marine Corps League
P.O.Box 1058
Lebanon, NH 03766

I enlisted in the Marine Corps April 23, 1965 under the 120 day delay program while in the senior year at Stevens High School, Claremont, New Hampshire. Shortly after graduation I shipped out for P.I. My father was a retired Marine M/SGT and I had been a service ‘brat’ so I knew what I was in line for. There were no surprizes at Boot Camp.

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I needed to tell you this

I needed to tell you this

Dear Sgt Grit Well it was that time again when I said goodbye to my son, of the few, of the proud. Strangely it was harder this time than the last time. Last time I watched a boy go off to war and this time I saw a man climb onto that bus. The reality of it is that the 3/2 lost 14 brave, courageous men at the last deployment. I started a scholarship here in Tampa, Florida for Lance Corporal Eric W. Herzberg, 20 years old killed by a sniper in Al Anbar Province and a friend of my son’s.

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Korea 1953

Korea 1953

Sir…

This is a photo that was taken with my Argus, C-3 camera, some time before July 16th 1953, and the last time I was on line. We were on hill 229; our MLR, our combat Outpost was Kate, hill 128= 2000 yards north, of the trench line at Able Gate. And Our Dog Company 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment Commander was Lt Col. Andrew Geer. Our Company Commanding Officer was Captain Woods, I had been a BAR man in the 3rd squad 2nd platoon 1st fire team for nine months, but had transferred to a 3.5 rocket launcher platoon in May 1953 when the 33rd draft arrived, My good buddy Cliff Kroeber encouraged me to do it. It was an easy transfer handled by Lt. Evans; he knew I had a wife and child waiting for me in Con.US. Before we went on the two MarLEXes = Marine landing EXersizes in May and June 1953 that I have recorded in my diary, and written about in another reflection, I trained on the weapon and became a gunner. Since I had survived a lot of line time for past nine months, and was getting close to being a short timer. Early in the morning after my night watch, I left Able Gate where I was stationed and passed through on my way to the supply point that was on south behind a hill where I would get a 5 gallon can of water; I stopped to say hi to these guys, and took this photo, the five Marines with mud on their bloused pants had been out on one of the patrols that were carried out each night, they probably hadn’t had a lot of sleep, [no we didn’t weekends off, our base pay was $122, $45 combat, $12 overseas; $10 was deducted for insurance each month there wasn’t much need for money since the Marine Corps gave us cloths ammo food, and a place to sleep, so I sent most of my pay home to my wife, Parthene. Keeping enough to buy film and pogy bate from the PX truck when we were off line.

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Marine Corps Humor: USMC vs. USN

Gunfights USMC V. USN
Recommended by: MSgt J. R. Cook, Ret.

USMC Rules for Gun fighting:

  1. Bring a gun. Preferably two guns. Bring all of your friends who have guns.
  2. Anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice. Ammo is cheap. Life is expensive.
  3. Only hits count. The only thing worse than a miss is a slow miss.
  4. Move away from your attacker. Distance is your friend. (Lateral and diagonal movement are preferred.)
  5. If you can choose what to bring to a gunfight, bring a long gun and a friend with a long gun.
  6. In ten years nobody will remember the details of caliber or tactics. They will only remember who lived.
  7. If you are not shooting, you should be communicating, reloading, and running.
  8. Use a gun that works EVERY TIME. “All skill is in vain when an angel pisses in the flintlock of your musket.”
  9. Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.
  10. Always cheat; always win. The only unfair fight is the one you lose.
  11. Have a plan.
  12. Have a back-up plan, because the first one won’t work.
  13. Use cover or concealment as much as possible.
  14. Flank your adversary when possible and always protect yours.
  15. Never drop your guard.
  16. Always tactical load and threat scan 360 degrees.
  17. Watch their hands. Hands kill. (In God we trust…everyone else keep your hands where I can see them).
  18. Decide to be aggressive ENOUGH, quickly ENOUGH…hesitation kills.
  19. The faster you finish the fight, the less injured you will get.
  20. Be polite. Be professional. And have a plan to kill everyone you meet.
  21. Be courteous to everyone, friendly to no one.
  22. Your number one option for Personal Security is a lifelong commitment to avoidance, deterrence, and de-escalation.
  23. Do not attend a gunfight with a handgun the caliber of which does not start with a “4.”

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