Pelelui Revisited

I have had the privilege and honor of visiting many of our WW2 Marine battlefields over the years and this past January, I visited Peleliu for the second time. With almost a full week of exploration, I was able to traverse much of the battlefield and get a feel for the terrain that our Marines dealt with in 1944. While the jungle has taken over much of the battlefield, one can still readily see how impossible the terrain was……craggy, sharp coral dominates the battlefield, whether it be low-lying coral ridges or the Umobrogal Mountains. I can't imagine fighting there, especially considering that in September 1944, there was very little foliage and the temperatures hovered around 100 degrees. We explored Bloody Nose Ridge, Pope's Ridge, the Point, and the coral Badlands, just to name a few. Signs of a desperate, horrific fight were everywhere. A Japanese tank still sits on the airfield where it was taken out by the 5th Marines…LTV's can be found…….shrapnel and battlefield debris are everywhere. We climbed and crawled through Bloody Nose Ridge, stopping at each fighting position, marveling at how the 1st Division Marines conquered a dug in enemy. While Iwo Jima and Tarawa hold much of our attention in Marine Corps history, Peleliu is arguably the toughest battle our Marines fought in WW2, when you consider the ferocity of the enemy, the climate, and the terrain.

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Red Dog Outing

Red Dog Outing

Red Dog Outing Hey Grit; Just thought I?d send this along. WWII Veteran Bernie Ruchin holds a get together each year at his home in Bedford NH for the Marines in the area. Marines from WWII up to Desert Storm and all ranks from Cpl to Col. Swap Sea Stories and shoot rifle and pistol competition. Bernie?s wife and daughter hosts the event, making sure the food never runs low.

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Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

Recently, I returned from a visit to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Attached are three picture – the first is the USS Arizona Memorial listing the Marines that died during 07 Dec 1941 – the second is of Puller Hall which is located on the Naval Base, the building is currently occupied but the exterior cannot be changed – the third is a Marine on duty at the entrance to the USS Arizona Memorial.
R.J. Emerton

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Facts about the End of WWII in Japan

A History Lesson
By: Ed Fulwider

A few months back you published letters from Janice Miller of San Mateo and Charlie Leonard of Danville regarding V-E Day, V-J Day and the question of when WWII ended. The upcoming ceremonies at golden Gate National Cemetery on 17 February, 2001, to commemorate the 56th anniversary of the Marine’s landing on Iwo Jima started me thinking about some very little known facts about the war’s end.

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Justified Use of the A-bomb

Sorry We Won The War?

(Reprinted with permission of Military magazine, 2122 28th St., Sacramento, CA 95818. A sample copy of Military may be obtained by writing to the above address)

The apologists, revisionists and the “America is always wrong” crowd have been busy as hell this summer. It’s hard to pick up a newspaper or turn on the TV without being told -America was wrong and inhumane for using the A-Bomb on Japan. . . not just by the Japanese, who have yet to even admit they started the war, or did anything wrong. . . but by the bleeding hearts those elitist media snobs have decided are the spokesmen for our conscience.

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Howard “Pappy” Young

Howard "Pappy" Young
In memory of…

Howard "Pappy" Young
Pappy Young
September 15, 1907 -June 22, 2005 TAPS
In memory of Howard L. "Pappy" Young

Pappy was born in the small Washington State town of Rockford on September 15, 1907 to Ida M. Buster and Coey A. Young. The family, which included in addition to Pappy a daughter Effie and another son named Harold, moved from Rockford to Spokane when Pappy was still a baby. Pappy resided in Spokane until he was called to active duty from the Marine Corps Reserves in 1940.Howard's Son

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George Medal

George Medal
Submitted by R.A. Wulff

In the early morning hours of August 7, 1942, elements of the First Marine Division made their way into the landing boats and began the assault on the Japanese held island of Guadalcanal. As in any conflict, there were to be many acts of heroism, untold fear and the seeds of legends. After an unopposed landing and the initial advance into the interior of the island by the Marines, the Japanese decided that it was time to drive the Americans away from Henderson Airfield and back to the beaches where the Japanese Army would annihilate them. The Marines saw it differently and the battle went from a sparing match to a brawl. It was the birth place of major offensive action and the thousands of telegrams that were to be sent to the front doors of American homes from the Pacific for the next three years.

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27th Marines on Iwo Jima Story

BLOOD PROMOTIONS: 27th Marines on Iwo Jima
Submitted by Chuck Tatum

Major Justin G. Duryea was the original commander of the 1st Bn 27th Marines. When he came aboard, he brought his staff from the parachute training school located at Camp Gillispie, California.

When Lt. Col Butler came aboard, the major moved up to regimental headquarters and became the 27th Marines operations officer. He received a promotion to Lt. Col. As an operation officer, he was in charge of plans and training. That chore included devising operational plans for all the battalions of the 27th Marine Regiment.

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