DI Motivation and Inspiration

We all have something our DI’s said to us or made us do. Something that inspires and motivates us to this day. Send me your example.

Semper Fi
Sgt Grit

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24 thoughts on “DI Motivation and Inspiration”

  1. “Sir, I forgot” when I forgot to do something in close order drill. Platoon Commander S/Sgt Borgoius, “What if I forgot to take you to chow? You’d be a starvin’ ragin’, idiot”.

  2. SGT Thomas, PI 3rd Batt ’65, demonstrating over hand pull ups. “If you can’t do do all ten pull ups at once, rest in the up position, sing the Marine Corps Hymn and you’ll wanna do 20 more!

  3. Staff Sgt. Gardner, Sgt. Cobb, and Sgt. Rivera stopped by the hut and said, “C’mon, girls, you’re going swimming”. It was hot summer day at boot camp in San Diego and I thought a swim would be great. We lined up, were led to a sand pit, told to lay on our bellies, and swim. Sand was flying everywhere. Lesson: don’t believe everything you’re told!!!

  4. sgt conboy upon getting first haircut said. ” you have no hair on the head of your dick so if suzy rottencrotch does not like because you have no hair on your head she’s not worth it.”

  5. My drill sgt ssgt Veasey stated we would not take a million dollars to forget parris island and we would not take a million to come back either, he was so correct

  6. When I was in boot camp I was told to report to the DI, with another recruit. When we got there the DI was cleaning his rifle. I was in front of the other recruit, so the DI addressed me. Asking why I had a visitor on visitors day. We did not expect a visitor, he was a marine in communications school, from our high school. The DI berated me, and hit me several times, with his rifle. He was apparently in a bad mood, our lead DI got orders for Vietnam, and this DI did not get the lead DI position, I’ll always remember being guilty of having a visitor on visitors day.

  7. I really learned many things from Boot Camp (MCRD-San Diego) and my DIs. The two that have followed me throughout my life is that if I managed to survive today, I should be able to survive tomorrow. Getting chewed out by the DIs was a great lesson for being out in the real world. All of my civilian bosses were such amateurs at ass chewings compared to Marine Corps DIs. When I was the boss in different situations I knew how to get my point across to my subordinates because I had great teachers in the Corps.

  8. One day a DI came in and as we stood at attention at the foot of our racks, he complained that someone in one of the other Quonset huts tried to cut his wrist. He said he was tired of hauling ass****’s like that to the hospital. He then proceeded to explain that we should jab into the wrist and cut everything. That way we would be sure to be dead before he had to take us to the hospital. With a bayonet in hand, just before he walked out the front door he turned and through the bayonet the length of the Quonset hut and stuck it in the back door. With all of us staring at the bayonet he walked out.

  9. THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU… QUONSET HUTS, PLATOON 1135 MCRD S.DIEGO 1966… S/SGT.BLUE, SGT. MC GEEN AND SGT. PALACIO… NEVRE TO BE FORGOTTEN…

  10. NO EXCUSE, SIR: Drill Instructor: “Are you dead, Scumbucket?” Recruit: “Sir, No Sir.” Drill Instructor: “Why are you not dead, Scumbuctet?” Recruit: “Sir, No excuse, Sir.” Drill Instructor: “Outstanding…carry on.”

  11. I got called to the DI’s Office while going through boot camp in 1950 at MCRDSAN. I was really nervous. Thought I must be in real trouble. After reporting in as you are supposed to, the DI asked, are you from Oklahoma. Sir Yes Sir! Well that’s great. I am too and you are going to be the honor recruit in our platoon, you understand. Sir Yes Sir! Dismissed and get with it. Sir Yes Sir! Broke my kneecap and had to spend time in the hospital during training. Got setback, so didn’t have to live up to his expectations. Guess he was disappointed.

  12. Summer 1957 Parris Island, 3rd Battalion Quonset huts. On the rare occasion of reporting to the Drill Instructors hut you had to bank on the side of the corrugated metal. Till your hand was almost bleeding all you received for your effort was “I can’t hear you” then how did he know I was there is all I could think of. I looked down and saw that the lower area of the door from on the corrugated metal and noticed it was as smooth as the area where I was banging. I continued to bang on the upper portion of the hut with my hand while I was kicking the lower. In response “what do you won’t maggot”

  13. MY FAVORITE TO THIS DAY. I ALWAYS LAUGH WHEN I THINK OFF IT ” YOUR LOWER THAN WHALE SHIT AND THAT’S ON THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN MAGGOT” I’M LAUGHING EVEN NOW AS I TYPE THIS. SEMPER FI MARINES.

  14. SGT GRIT should check out “SH*TBIRD! How I Learned to Love The Corps” for memorable DI quotes. Semper Fi jarheads

  15. Sgt. Franks – PLT. 3095, Graduated 25 JAN 82, Parris Island – “Quitters never WIN and WINNERS never QUIT”.

  16. I was in boot camp at MCRD San Diego in the fall of 1967 and one of my DI’s, SSgt. Francisco Urrutia (RIP) was addressing one of my shortcomings. He asked me why I had done something (or didn’t do something I was supposed to) and I said “the Private has no excuse, sir!” It was the standard answer; what else could you say? Ssgt. Urrutia said “ damn right you got no excuse! Do you know WHY you have no excuse?” I replied that I didn’t. He said “because, Private Lariviere, excuses are like a**holes – everybody’s got one!” My son, as a teenager, heard that line several times…..

  17. Parris Island, S.C. 1961. Had a SSgt (E-5) Livingston (JDI) when he figured that I had screwed up, he would stand in front of me and scream about this and that,,,,,,he would always call me “a long stale bag of urination”. I was 18 yrs. young & 6 foot 4 inches tall. As I stood there at attention, my eyes almost were able to see completely over his campaign hat. I believe he may have been sensitive about being shorter than some of us. SEMPER FI !!

  18. Probably the one that stuck with me the most was Sgt Dryer told us you are all a bunch of quitters some of you could not even make it thru school without quitting. I have remembered that since he said it and used it especially while on the job being a plant electrician I run into a lot of problems that I wanted to walk away from but that always came back I didn’t fix everything but I stuck with it or got the help that was needed. Still have to stay with anything I’m doing till it’s done and hate to get whipped. Thanks Sgt Dryer and the USMC made me what I am today

  19. MCRDPI 1974. 2nd Batt. We were told that “Everyday is a holiday and every meal is a feast”. This has allowed me to appreciate all that I have today.

  20. I comment I will never forget is when G/Sgt. Okley said you might learn anything thing here but when you leave you will shiting muscle.

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