Sgt. Grit Community

Uncontrolled Hysteria

When my buddies back in the United States were studying for their mid-terms, I was walking point for the first platoon of Bravo Company in the tropical jungles of Vietnam. Unlike the many occasions students are afforded leisure time – it was a rare day in Vietnam when we were given time off to relax and have fun. Therefore it was a marvelous treat when, one day, we were given the opportunity to spend a couple of hours swimming in a muddy river. We placed guards on either side of the river for security and the rest of us went swimming in our birthday suits.

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When The Old DI Emerged

As a life-long believer in personal responsibility, decided that even as a field grade officer that if I was going to get kilt in a MVA (Motor Vehicle Accident), it was going to be because of something I did (or failed to do?) and not the fault of a Lance Corporal who was still using zit cream as after-shave. In other words, if I was in a Marine Corps vehicle, tactical or non-tactical, the Major was going to be driving. This occasionally caused some consternation among my brother officers, who would have questions like “how do you get the vehicle washed (or fueled, or ???)”… you know, that is sort of manual labor, which in garrison, is somehow deemed not fitting for officers… and somehow, the critics never quite made the connection between the fact that they had driven themselves into work that day… probably in a car that they had hand-waxed in the driveway of their quarters the preceding weekend… at any rate, at the Stumps in the mid-70’s, duty occasionally called somewhere off base, which meant a vehicle from the Commercial Motor Pool (10th Street, still there last time I flew Google Earth over the base)… The C-Pool had quite a mixture of civilian vehicles (including the CG’s sedan)… pickups, flat bed cargo trucks, cattle cars, MP vehicles (Plymouth Belvederes… four-door sedans, with a 318 Mopar)… and for some odd reason, exactly one Ford… a two-door small sedan, Marine Corps green on bottom, white on top… can’t say for sure but it was either a Pinto or a Maverick… and usually available, as it was just not cool for trips off base, when you could reserve a sedan, sit in the back and look important while PFC Johnny 35XX drove. It was my first choice every time, for trips to Pendleton, LA, the San Bernardino County prison (to deliver pothead/dopers BCD papers… always timed to be there at lunch in the guards’ mess… prison guards eat well… very well… and they like Marines… “what would you like, sir? T-bone be OK?, how would you like that? etc.”)… and the reason for the Pinto/Maverick? It’s a long way from the Stumps to anywhere… and this was the ONLY vehicle in the C-Pool that had a radio… AM only, to be sure, but a radio nonetheless. At the time, the radio was a ‘delete option’ meaning that if the buyer didn’t specify “no radio”… the car came with one.

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Memories Of MCAS El Toro

I have many fond memories of MCAS El Toro. I was stationed there from Nov. ’56 thru Nov. ’59. I served with MARS-37 as a 6442 Hydraulics Repairman MOS. I would like to know where MARS-37 was moved to. I participated in the Fleet Schooling (acceptance) programs for the FJ4B North American A/C and later for the F8U Crusader A/C, known as FIP’s (Fleet Introduction Programs).

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“MARAUDING” MARINE MAKES MARK WITH MANUSCRIPT

“MARAUDING” MARINE MAKES MARK WITH MANUSCRIPT

By Shannon Collins, Defense Media Activity

Former Marine LCpl. David Roach, author of the “Marauder” Viking fantasy series, hands his new book, “Runebinder” to Navy Lt. Rosert Pfeiffer, Office Naval Intelligence, Washington, D.C., at Vikings Con in LaPlata, Maryland, Oct. 20, 2018.

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Former Marine LCpl. David Roach, author of the “Marauder” Viking fantasy series, hands his new book, “Runebinder” to Navy Lt. Rosert Pfeiffer, Office Naval Intelligence, Washington, D.C., at Vikings Con in LaPlata, Maryland, Oct. 20, 2018.

Former jack-of-all trades Marine Reservist Lance Cpl. David Roach spent six years learning infantry tactics, machine gunnery, bulk fuels and heavy equipment while serving in the Marine Corps from 2002-2008.
Throughout his security career, he’s gone from a mall cop and security guard to being in charge of security personnel for hospitals, airports and companies. Currently, he’s a global security manager focused on crisis management, disaster monitoring and open source intelligence.

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EYE IN THE SKY

It’s 2:00 a.m. on the Camp Pendleton coastline. Along the pitch-black rigid waters, an unknown object sends a signal to a Marine monitoring the shores with the lattice modular heli-drone security system. With the lift of a finger and press of a button, a drone is deployed to investigate, relay back crystal-clear footage and provide images that reveal a smuggling vessel slithering its way through our waters.

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EIGHT GOLD STARS, ONE BRONZE AND ONE PURPLE HEART AWARDED

In one of the largest presentation ceremonies ever held at Camp Lejeune, eight Gold Stars in lieu of second Purple Hearts, one Bronze Star and one Purple Heart were awarded to ten Marine Veterans Saturday at the Hadnot Point parade ground by Lt. Col. T. M. Sheffield, Infantry Training Regiment, and Major L. G. Ditta, Infantry School Battalion.

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NOVEMBER COMPANY BECOMES FIRST COMPANY TO GRADUATE IN NEW FEMALE DRESS BLUES

A company of female Marines made history Friday after becoming the first group of new Marines to debut the Corps’ latest dress uniform.

The approximately 129 Marines of November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion were the first on the depot to graduate recruit training in the new version of the female Blue Dress Coat.

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43 YEARS LATER, RETIRED VIETNAM VET RECEIVES NAVY CROSS

It’s the summer of 1968 in Vietnam, a sergeant with Company K, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment was forced into a position he never could have imagined. He had to lead his entire company through a deadly enemy ambush after the company commander, platoon commander and senior enlisted leadership were wounded in the fight.

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We Heard The Tupe, Tupe

Right after Dewey Canyon we received a new platoon commander, Lt. R. We were his first command and I’m sure he wanted to do everything right. I’m almost positive it was operation Apache Snow, of course the Lt. was the last one on the chopper to lead us off. This was only my second operation but after life in the Valley it seemed I had been in Vietnam forever! Our new Lt. with map and compass in hand stood by the ramp ready to lead us into combat. Thank God it was a cold LZ, we touched down and he walked off the chopper? Still looking at his map and compass, a lowly private ran past him and the others followed to set up our section of the perimeter. That lowly private just happened to be me, little did I know I was about to receive a royal a$$ chewing. After all was secure I was singled out and told in no uncertain terms never to run past my commanding officer(putting it lightly). Later on that day our new Lt. called a break, our 10 minutes was almost up when in the distance we heard the tupe, tupe of incoming mortars. Needless to say we all did the Marine Corps disappearing act. I looked up from my small depression in mother earth only to see the new Lt. still looking at his map and compass oblivious of what was about to happen. Thankfully the mortars fell short of the target and all of us were spared. I’m not sure whether he got a heads up from our NCOs or he just figured it out all by himself but later that evening I received a visitor with an apology, it was our new Lt. He turned out to be one of the best officers I ever served under. Wishing you well Lt. R and hope life has treated you well! Semper Fi
W. Whitley, Corporal of Marines!

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