MARINE OF THE WEEK:

MARINE OF THE WEEK:

SHOT IN NECK, KEEPS FIGHTING

Lance Cpl. Cody Goebel
3rd Battalion, 5th Marines
Sangin, Afghanistan, Nov. 22, 2010
Award: Silver Star

While in Afghanistan’s Helmand province, Lance Cpl. Goebel was manning a security position in the southern Green Zone of Sangin District when he was struck in the neck by enemy small arms fire. Knocked to the ground and severely wounded at his post, he quickly picked himself up, remounted his machine gun, and engaged the enemy’s firing position with full knowledge that his position was critical to his squad’s defense. For seven minutes, he ignored his life threatening wounds and delivered devastating machine gun fire on the enemy’s position, all while refusing medical attention until he was properly relieved. Finally, but only after a fellow squad member had manned his machine gun, Goebel moved 25 meters under his own power and under heavy fire across the observation post’s roof and down a 20-foot ladder to the casualty collection point. Upon reaching the ground, he collapsed due to the loss of blood and had to be carried to a helicopter landing zone for subsequent medical evacuation. His courage, heroism, and dedication to duty after sustaining a life threatening injury resulted in the successful blocking of an enemy attack and six enemy fighters killed. (U.S. Marines photos by Sgt. Timothy Lenzo)

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1st 72 hours in the Corps

o800 hours on April 5 1961 , as requested, was standing in front of the Post Office of my home town, waiting for my recruiter to pick me up drive me to his office in Nashville Tn and complete the enlistment process. On the way I mentioned something to him that I heard they harassed you some at P I. He at first acted like he didn’t know the meaning of the word and then said maybe for the first couple days but that I shouldn’t worry about it. Easy for him say. Got to the office and met up with 3 other guys from other towns in Middle Tn. Spent the day doing paper work, getting sworn and killing time . Some time in the late afternoon we were walked to the Railroad Station, given our orders, a couple meal tickets and instructions on how to find the bus depot in Atlanta and what time we better be there. Got to Atlanta early on the morning of the 6th and several hours to kill before our bus time in late afternoon. Passed a tattoo parlor and one of the other guys decided that since we were now in the Corps he would get a Devil Dog tattoo.

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The Good Ship Lollipop

I don’t like to swim in the ocean. Sand gets in places it was never meant to be. That may be ironic since I wound up in the Marines. I had never been on any water craft bigger than a 15-foot fishing boat when I joined the Corps in 1958, so I had never experienced sailing on the deep blue. By the time I shipped over to Okinawa I had only flown commercial a couple times on Bonanza Airlines between San Diego and Phoenix – the first time on a DC-3, the second on a small turbo-prop. I hadn’t experienced air sickness either time so I was unprepared for what was ahead.

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Bound and Determined

Bound and Determined

It was in the late summer or early fall of 1963, when at the age of 17, I got my parents to sign the consent form needed to enlist in the Marine Corps. With the consent form and pocket full of promises from the local recruiter I went down to Whitehall Street in lower Manhattan, NY to join up.
During my physical exam the Army doctor, who looked like he was about 80 years old, mixed up my paper work with the poor guy standing next to me. This guy had rheumatic fever as a child and should have been classified 4-F.Unfortunately he got my 1-A classification and I got the 4-F classification.
I was not a happy camper! To let everyone know they made a big mistake I shouted, cursed and threatened everyone around me until I was given the “bum’s rush” and escorted out the door.
Not willing to give up my quest to join the Marine Corps, I waited about two months and went to a different recruiter and started the process all over again. Remember this was the pre-computer days and you could get away with it.
On the day of my physical exam I had a different doctor. I passed the exam without a problem. As I was mentally congratulating myself I felt a tap on my shoulder. I turned around and was stating at a chest full of ribbons. I’m 6”1” but I had to look up about six inches to see a face that belonged to a very large MP. Behind him was an even larger MP. I was informed that I was about to be arrested for fraudulent enlistment. Of course I denied I was ever there before and tried to convince them they were mistaking me for someone else. One of the MP’s laughed and said that I made such a big stink he actually put a photo of me on his wall in the MP office.
After some desperate negotiations on my part the OIC at Whitehall Street told me to come back at 7:30 AM the next morning with an overnight bag. He told me I was going to be shipped over to Governor’s Island for a series of exams to see if I would pass a more stringent physical exam.
The next morning I boarded a ferry boat to Governor’s Island. There were twelve passengers going for physicals. Eleven of them were trying to get out of the Army and I was trying to get into the Marine Corps. I never regretted getting on that ferry boat.
Fast forward from that point on….I went to Parris Island in the first week of January 1964….made PFC out of Boot Camp…..and was attached to the one of the first combat units into Vietnam- 1st Battalion 3rd Marines in 1965.

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Vietnam War: Facts, Stats & Myths

Myth: Common belief is that most Vietnam veterans were drafted.
Fact: 2/3 of the men who served in Vietnam were volunteers. 2/3 of the men who served in World War II were drafted. Approximately 70% of those killed in Vietnam were volunteers.

9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the official Vietnam era from August 5, 1964 to May 7, 1975.

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MARINE OF THE WEEK // “It was probably one of the hardest things I ever did.”

Staff Sgt. Timothy Williams
Reconnaissance Section Assistant Team Leader, RCT-6, 1st Marine DivisionI Marine Expeditionary Force (I MEF).
July 10, 2012
Award: Silver Star

While a member of a 15 man joint Afghan National Army and Marine force, the patrol came under intense and accurate fire from a numerically superior force. Throughout the following 10 hour engagement Staff Sergeant Williams took direct action to counter the ambush and repeatedly displayed superior leadership while directing his team under heavy small arms fire from fixed Taliban positions. Upon discovering his team leader was seriously wounded, Staff Sergeant Williams sprinted across 60 meters of open terrain, exposing himself to accurate enemy fire in order to aid and evacuate the wounded Marine. Staff Sergeant Williams exposed himself to accurate enemy fire yet again when he carried the wounded Marine over 300 meters of uneven terrain to the medical evacuation platform. He then took charge of the joint element and continued the assault on the enemy, personally killing 5 enemy fighters, while moving the team more than 2600 meters toward a trapped Quick Reaction Force and establishing firm defensive positions repelling the enemy. Through his sound tactical and technical proficiencies, he led his element to effectively neutralize numerous Taliban positions and an estimated 20 Taliban fighters across 3,000 meters of arduous terrain. By his bold leadership, extraordinary initiative, and undaunted courage, Staff Sergeant Williams reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United Stated Naval Service.

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We know where you’re going

April 4, 1962, along with a large group of recruits, I was inducted into the Corps at New York City and put on a chartered American Airlines flight to PI. Once airborne, a young looking recruit asked the stewardess for a beer. She complied and another recruit saw the transaction and stated, “Hey, I didn’t know you could get served”. The stewardess, overhearing the comment stated, “We know where you’re going”. Needless to say, the airplane’s alcoholic beverage supply was severely depleted prior to landing in South Carolina. It was a very social group of recruits that arrived at PI’s main gate in the subsequent bus ride. All was fine until that DI stepped onto the bus and boomed out, “All right, Maggots, eyes straight ahead and listen up” You know the rest of the story…………

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A walk through The Arizona Territory.

Before I share this story I would like to explain that I wrote these in order to deal with my PTSD. I also thought my family might be interested in learning why I “seem different” to them by sharing some of my experiences. Which is why the stories were written as they were. Those combat Marines who served in Vietnam might remember that we were not very popular back home. I wrote about 50 stories—they are true—they happen to me—I remember every one like it happen yesterday and for awhile these experiences changed my way of thinking, feeling, and interacting with others (including my family). I found that the VA has an excellent treatment program that worked me. “Thank you my brothers and Semper Fi.”

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Info For Marine Enlistees Leaving For Training

While searching through my collection of Marine memorabilia I found a paper with general information about leaving for recruit training.
What to take: Small gym bag, change of underwear & socks, extra shirt, soap, towel, toothbrush etc..
What not to take: Knives,guns,blackjacks, brass knuckles or any other dangerous objects including glass bottles. No alcoholic beverages or large amounts of money. Common sense should judge what to take. ( We had alcohol on the bus from Charleston to P.I. and one guy packed a 12 inch screwdriver that was found during receiving )
General Info: You will be going to Parris Island, S.C. for approximately 10 weeks of recruit training and then to Camp Lejeune N.C. for 4 weeks of Individual Combat Training . While at Parris Island you will participate in the most challenging ,most rigorous and finest training in the world. The best advice to give you is to do as you are told and always give your best. You will be treated well, and remember that the Marine Corps is always interested in your welfare. To put you one step ahead of the game memorize you service number and the General Orders listed below. Welcome aboard , Marine. Good luck and come and visit us on you return from boot camp.
I condensed it a little. Bring back any memories? Will soon be 53 years. What a time! SEMPER FI! Harry 1371

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And So It Began

Scene: Tun Tavern, Philadelphia. Date: 1775 Time: Evening.

Lt. O’Bannon was sitting at a candle-lit table with a feather pen and an open ledger before him.
He was recruiting the world’s first U. S. Marine Detachment. The first potential recruit, whose name has been lost in antiquity, walked up and said, “What’s the deal?” O’Bannon said, “Just sign this book, and I’ll give you $5, which is your first month’s pay, a bottle of whiskey and you’re in. Of course you have to have your own musket.”

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