Stone Faced Few

STONE FACED FEW
by LCpl Keel

All this happiness,
All of these sorrows,
Bottled up anger and a smirk on the surface,
Do you all see this?
We rose to the call,
and at times of inspection we shine,
Eyes clouded with worry and doubt,
carrying the weight,
Endless humps and a longing glance,
A thousand yard stare and a sneer from one passing by,
Cold beyond the soul,
Clambering hands that search for our hearts,
Promises of punishment to those who hurt the ones we have,
On the inside these eyes see red,
On the outside, rifle in hand and a stone set face,
Our hands ready to release the anger,
Wishing to drop the weight,
Lashing out,
And still wondering why,
We see you walk by,
With your fake smiles and forced laughs,
Your ever critical stare,
Criticize I.
Not ME,
for there was only once a soul.
Not US,
for we have done nothing so undeserving as to receive what you readily dish out. Happily force feeding,
yet can you swallow your own poisonous criticism?
Have we lost these “souls” as you say,
or do you simply take your easy route and ignore them?
We watch you as your behavior is strange.
A cry for help then a shove from our shelter,
Were moving on.
Boots laced tight,
endless miles ahead.
True laughter and a shot held high for those who are gone.
We are ready,
Then the surface calms and the thousand yard stare is regained.

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A Love Stronger Than Life – Marine Corps Poem

A Love Stronger Than Life
By: Lindsey Harland

When I woke up that day,
I felt a bit strange.
I was thinking of life,
and how so many things change.

My Marine had come home
only three days before
that morning I realized
why I was living with the Corps.

Our story began
so long ago,
so young and in high school
and so eager to go

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Such As Regiments Hand Down Forever

Such As Regiments Hand Down Forever
by Jim Isajewicz, 2007

At attention; as the Anthem plays
I remember the look on each man?s face.
As I stand straight, some of them stoop
But each man?s heart is tall

So the music ends; all hands retract
And forward comes the entire pack
Of Devil Dogs, less lean but mean
As any of us have been.

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Taps

TAPS
SSGT Francis X Curran USMC (Ret.)

A soul wrenching sound echoes across the land,
As the Souls of the innocents shoulder-to-shoulder stand.
(Day is done, nine -one- one.)

Bugles sob, survivor?s weep,
And a Nation vows its word to keep.
(Gone the sun, nine-one-one.)

At ground Zero, where the towers fell,
Hero?s marched bravely into Hell.
(Day is done, nine-one-one.)

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Marine Corps Emblem Tattoo Poem

The Tattoo
By: Gerald F. Merna and Dean A. Smith

Over waffles and coffee in the Reston VA Diner one morning
Two friends recalled Marine memories, and an idea came aborning
In common they shared their deep love of the Corps
And each lamented they failed a tattoo to score
merna1-sm (2K)
Each said to the other they “always wanted a tattoo”
Of Eagle, Globe and Anchor, with service dates too
Allowing the Emblem was among overlooked needs,
After years of Corps’ service, performing honorable deeds.
merna2-sm (5K)
Both agreed they’d go get one (with a slight hint of bluff?)
Firmly determined that they still “had the right stuff.”
So to Leesburg they traveled, with nary a blink
To Loudoun’s only tattoo parlor, appropriately named “Insane Ink”
merna3-sm (5K)
The apparent age difference between these proud Marines
Mattered not because they had parallel dreams
So waivers and fees accomplished, Jerry would be first to explore
The needle’s irritating flow and its motors grating score
merna4-sm (3K) merna5-sm (3K)
“How’s it feel” thoughtfully inquired the younger Dean
Upon seeing slight grimaces from the older Marine
“Not as bad as I thought, but I could do with a ‘Bud,”
Was the answer from Jerry showing a few droplets of blood.
merna6-sm (4K)
Almost two hours later, a gold-colored Emblem appeared
Then the artist ensured Jerry’s forearm was surgically cleared
Dean snapped a few pictures to record this event
So both could show later how much this really meant
The new Emblem in color loomed bright and clear
With inscribed years of service, and “Dot Forever” for his Spouse so dear
merna7 (4K)
USMC 19471968
Dot1951Forever
“Now it’s your turn,” the artist matter-of-factly did announce
And pointed to Dean who entered, though not with a bounce.
merna8-sm (3K)
A name for his forearm was first, an arm so large for one word
But its five letters spelled out a fine name to be heard
merna9-sm (3K)
The name “B E C C A” emerged in amorous ink
The light of Dean’s life, of her and Son Nick he does lovingly think
Now for the hard part, the needle on calf
“Stretch out on this bench” said the artist with a laugh.
But as long as it was, the bench was no prize
Because our man Dean is not of average size
merna10-sm (5K)
It was Jerry’s turn to watch, taking pictures as well
While Dean endured his two hours of hell
merna11-sm (4K)
While a radio played mindlessly (with some heavy metal band)
Dean’s Marine Emblem took form, and looked just grand
Displaying the Camp David logo, his earned choice of brand
merna12 (9K)
MARINE SECURITY CO.
CAMP DAVID
Both men’s art was bandaged; they were no worse for the fray
And Dean and Jerry headed home, their new tattoos to display
But their dreams were accomplished, and they both did endure
And forever possess the Emblem worn only by Marines of the Corps
merna14-sm (9K) merna13-sm (7K)
Gerald F. Merna
Dean A. Smith
GFM-08-11-02

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Tears

You know the saying “every Marine is a rifleman,” well I am proof of it. I was stationed at Canp Pend. in Feb 1968 as a truck mechanic (3516), Tet was in full bloom. When the 27th Marines were sent to Viet Nam, I went along, as a grunt. From a mechanic to a grunt in a couple of hours. What a lot of people didn’t know was that the men of the 3rd Bn 27th Marines in Nam were mostly of non-grunt MOS’s. But that didn’t stop us from doing our jobs. One of our Marines was awarded the MOH, his name was Robert Burke(I believe he is the youngest person to win the MOH in Viet Nam)

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