Sgt. Grit Community

Radios Save Lives

RADIO’S SAVE LIVES
Terrorists Attack US Consulate Jeddah
6 December 2004 11:00 local time
Written by Lester M. Brayshaw IPO Jeddah 12 Dec 2004.

Staff was just getting up from a Management meeting when suddenly a heavy metallic crash was heard outside. This was followed by a loud explosion and rapid automatic fire coming from the direction of Bravo gate. The American consulate was under attack and terrorists were advancing on the chancery at a lighting speed! We had to reach the IPC Safehaven. I was in the IPO and folks would be depending on me to let them in! Within seconds, I made it into the CAA hallway just as duck and cover alarms went off. I could hear more machine gun fire near the chancery. My heart was pounding as I saw our Security officers running for their weapons.

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Snakes in the Attack

CALLSIGN “DEADLY”SNAKES IN THE ATTACK
A Personal Account of an AH-1W Pilot During the War with Iraq

Author’s NoteThis personal account of the war in Iraq was written to convey to my family and friends just what I went through during the war. Therefore, it is not an official history of what my unit accomplished or participated in, but rather a “Rated PG-13” and unclassified version of what I experienced. My concern is that this journal is forwarded in e-mails to others outside of my circle… and I want to ensure that when this falls into a stranger’s hands, that what I’ve written is taken in context with the how and why I composed this piece. These observations and opinions are mine alone. They don’t represent my command, or the United States Marine Corps. JLC

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Squad Tactics in Fallujah

Squad Tactics in Fallujah
NCO’s combat journal offers look inside squad tactics in Fallujah.
April 25, 2005

Grunt gouge
NCO’s combat journal offers look inside squad tactics in Fallujah

By Laura Bailey
Times staff writer

Perhaps no one was in a better position to see what was going on in the streets and houses of Fallujah last fall than Sgt. Earl Catagnus Jr. and his team of snipers.

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The Little Korean Girl and The Apple

The Little Korean Girl and The Apple
By: Howard E Frasier

Korean children reaching for apple I took three photos late April 1953, which developed into quite a story. I was with Dog Company 5th Regiment, 1st Marine Division. While we boarded old Japanese built rail cars coupled up to a steam engine, I named the old ?Honey bucket Express? while we were boarding the rail cars old Korean men worked up and down the tracks, oiling all of the moving parts of the engine. Then opening the packing lids on the rail car wheels, and adding oil, letting them close with a loud clang. A tank filled to provide water for the boilers and the coal hopper was shoved full. When that was over one of them swung a signal lantern and we left on a 4 to 6 hour 55-mile ride to the port of Inchon Korea. Where a convoy of ships laid waiting to take us on a MarLEX = Marine Landing EXersizes. She never attained a top speed of over 40-m.p.h. Shortly after we were underway, we ate rations for chow, previously loaded by the service battalion, along with fruit, and treated potable water in five-gallon cans used to refilled canteens. The railcars had rows of wooden seats back to back, bolted down to a bare wooden floor on either side of a center isle there were no toilets, or running water, so we made a number of stops along the way for head calls^, military traffic animal crossings, and other trains. As we traveled through the countryside, Korean people working out in rice fields carried wooden yokes on their shoulders with two buckets hung either side using a gourd dipper, dipping from ?honey buckets?, and pouring it down the rows, it was human excrement.

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Able Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines

Able Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines
The story of Ron Broward

The Chosin Reservoir:  a key part of the 1st Marine Division's history and the start of Ron Broward's time as a United States Marine. In 1950, the north Koreans were almost successful in using their military to secure the Korean peninsula. A number of strategic-level events stopped them short, such as the rapid build-up of U.S. forces, the overextension of north Korean supply lines, and the cumulative losses the north Koreans suffered after so many days of combat. The surprise American attack through Inchon and into Seoul severed the north’s supply lines and sent them fleeing. American, Republic of Korea (ROK), and UN forces drove them all the way to the Yalu River. That’s when the Chinese intervened.

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Korea’s Chosin Reservoir

The Chosin Reservoir Campign
Author Unknown

In the mountainous terrain of North Korea during sub-zero winter conditions, along and in the hills surrounding a primitive road barely wide enough for a single modern vehicle to pass, the battle of Chosin Reservoir took place. It has been termed by historians as the most savage battle in modern warfare, and was cited by President Reagan in his first inaugural address as one of the epics of military history.

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Korea 1953

Korea 1953

Sir…

This is a photo that was taken with my Argus, C-3 camera, some time before July 16th 1953, and the last time I was on line. We were on hill 229; our MLR, our combat Outpost was Kate, hill 128= 2000 yards north, of the trench line at Able Gate. And Our Dog Company 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment Commander was Lt Col. Andrew Geer. Our Company Commanding Officer was Captain Woods, I had been a BAR man in the 3rd squad 2nd platoon 1st fire team for nine months, but had transferred to a 3.5 rocket launcher platoon in May 1953 when the 33rd draft arrived, My good buddy Cliff Kroeber encouraged me to do it. It was an easy transfer handled by Lt. Evans; he knew I had a wife and child waiting for me in Con.US. Before we went on the two MarLEXes = Marine landing EXersizes in May and June 1953 that I have recorded in my diary, and written about in another reflection, I trained on the weapon and became a gunner. Since I had survived a lot of line time for past nine months, and was getting close to being a short timer. Early in the morning after my night watch, I left Able Gate where I was stationed and passed through on my way to the supply point that was on south behind a hill where I would get a 5 gallon can of water; I stopped to say hi to these guys, and took this photo, the five Marines with mud on their bloused pants had been out on one of the patrols that were carried out each night, they probably hadn’t had a lot of sleep, [no we didn’t weekends off, our base pay was $122, $45 combat, $12 overseas; $10 was deducted for insurance each month there wasn’t much need for money since the Marine Corps gave us cloths ammo food, and a place to sleep, so I sent most of my pay home to my wife, Parthene. Keeping enough to buy film and pogy bate from the PX truck when we were off line.

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An Account of “Incoming Fire” over two Gooks

Two Gooks on a Jeep!
By Chris Sarno

It was mid autumn 1951 on the Eastern Front at the Punchbowl sector. I was basically a boot-ass replacement in “A” Company 1st Tank Battalion (Our Company Commander was Capt. Schnell), and I was anxiously awaiting my baptism of fire any day now, as our tank company was operating practically every other day with direct fire combat missions.

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The Fourth Marines in Shanghai, China

THE FOURTH MARINES IN SHANGHAI, CHINA

While Shanghai is rapidly changing with old buildings giving way to new buildings, there are still many places remaining related to the Fourth Marine regiment's long presence in the city from 1927 to 1941. The 1st and 3rd Battalions of the regiment were deployed to Shanghai in 1927 to protect American citizens and property in Shanghai's International Settlement (the "Settlement") on the Puxi or west side of the Huangpu River (then called the Whampoo River). The 2nd Battalion was deployed to Tientsin, China at the same time and redesignated into another regiment. The 2nd Battalion of the Fourth Marines was reactivated in Shanghai on September 18, 1932 in order for the regiment to be at full strength to effectively defend the U.S. defense sector of the Settlement. The 3rd Battalion was deactivated in Shanghai on December 19, 1934.

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